My views on stay-at-home motherhood have evolved over the years.

Prior to being saved, I was a 21st century modernist. Even after conversion, I’ve only gradually come to appreciate the value of homemaking women. I’ve since weighed this topic and tried to make up my mind, but since I’ve never been married or engaged, I’ve chosen to defer it.

However, thanks to some ANR-friendly women, the scales are definitely tipped in favour of homemaking womanhood.

ANR-interested women tend to be great wives and mothers. Two in particular that I chatted with adamantly insisted on being stay-at-home mothers, doggedly resisting my playful teasing about embracing 21st century feminist women’s liberation.

Feminism is not the antithesis of ANR. Quite the contrary, many ANR-women tend to be very traditional feminists, click here for an example. One ANR blogger prided herself on being a bra-hating, long skirt-wearing, traditional feminist.

In the end, I agree with John Macarthur and Grace to You, that as long as her biblical obligation to prioritize her home isn’t neglected, a woman has divine freedom to work outside the home:

“There is nothing in Scripture, however, that specifically forbids women from working, as long as they are fulfilling the priority in the home (Proverbs 31).

Whether a woman works outside the home or not, however, God’s primary calling for her is to manage the home.” (Source: What should a wife’s priorities be? Can she work outside the home?)

The woman who enjoys ANRs is typically the classic traditional type. The type that takes pride in her femininity, is very warm, nurturing and delights in the uniquely feminine experiences of pregnancy, childbirth and breastfeeding. And is very open to the idea of stay-at-home mothering.

The dynamic of the breadwinner returning home after the daily grind to feed his family and then “fed” himself by his loving wife is a very biblical one.

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